IPONING 101: The K-Pop Stan’s Guide to Saving Up

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“I-announce niyo na yung ticket prices, please, para makapag-ipon na ko!”

“Ang lapit naman ng ticket selling! ‘Di pa ko nakaka-ipon! T.T”

“Ang mahal naman! Wala pa ‘kong pera!!!”

Do these sound familiar? You must have cried something similar at least once in your life as a fan, and I could totally relate!

Being a K-Pop stan is costly. This is something I learned the hard way when I entered the fandom a little over a year ago with a decent account balance, only to feel as though I’ve gone bankrupt a few months later with more artist merchandise than money in my possession.

True enough, it’s all fun and exciting until you realize that you pretty much have nothing left to spend for more important things and – well, let’s all be honest here – more K-Pop. So what’s the right thing for a fan to do? Iponing, of course!

Saving up has since become more than just a habit to me; it’s a lifestyle, as it should be for you. After all, how else would you fund that gorgeous comeback album or that much-coveted concert ticket? If you’ve got better ideas, let me know. But for now, here are some tips on mindful saving and spending for K-Pop fans:

Don’t wait. Just start.
There’s no better time to start saving up than NOW. Even though it has not been announced that your favorite group is coming to the country or that they will be releasing a new album soon, it would be smart of you to grow your fandom fund as early as now, so when the time comes, you wouldn’t have to worry about not being able to afford joining a group order or being part of #TeamBahay – slash – #TeamLabas.

Set a goal
All of us have something we want to save up for, and for fans, it’s most likely a concert, a comeback album, or a dream trip to the mecca of K-Pop and K-Dramas, South Korea.

Now, think about what yours is and focus on that goal. Make a rough estimate of the price that comes with it, then use it as your target. It may seem tough to achieve at first, but not impossible. You’ll feel much more motivated to save up if you have a definite goal in mind.

Decide on where to keep your savings
So is it the old school glass jar or cutesy piggy bank for you? Whatever you choose, know that deciding on where to keep your savings is crucial. Make sure it’s accessible and convenient yet secured.

Personally, I prefer keeping my savings in the bank. I have an account that I maintain to fund my wants and wants only, which includes my K-Pop splurges. This prevents me from touching the amount I have in my actual savings account, which I consider strictly off-limits.

Compromise, not sacrifice.
They say a bit of sacrifice goes a long way. But don’t you think “sacrifice” is too dramatic a word? If anything, it makes the whole idea of saving up more daunting! So I say compromise – not sacrifice.

How? Well, there are “little” things you spend on daily that you can get through more cost-efficient means. Start keeping track of your expenses, and check which items you can cut back on or, better yet, ultimately stop paying for.

For instance, instead of buying coffee at your favorite café, why not just make your own brew at home? Ever considered bringing packed (and healthier) meals to school or work? How about bringing your own bottle of water or snacks to curb those sudden cravings?

While the small stuff you spend on may not be that noticeable in your everyday spending pattern, such expenses add up in the long run. Think about it, if you get your caffeine fix for P120 every weekday for six months, that amounts to P15,480, which is more than enough to cover an SVIP ticket to your favorite group’s concert, or, maybe, even a roundrip ticket to Korea!

Control
Control is a word I find synonymous to discipline, and saving money requires a lot of it.

Before you buy anything – and I mean anything – hold a mental debate whether or not you need it. If you hesitate even just a bit before saying yes, then, perhaps, it’s more of a want than a need, and you’re better off not buying it at the time being.

There are a lot of purchases I made in the past that I totally regret now. So save yourself the guilt, and just give up on that item you know wouldn’t come in handy in the near future.

Put your skills and free time to good use
Earning some extra on the side helps A LOT. It doesn’t matter how old you are. If you’ve got skills you know you can use to earn money, make good use of them.

For instance, if you have a proclivity for making fan art, then why not sell some unofficial merch? A friend of mine, who has a good hand in graphic design, produced bags, coin purses, and banners  – all printed with a design she made – to sell in time for a boy group’s then-upcoming concert. She did it out of fun, so she was really taken by surprise when the items sold out quicker than expected. She even had to make another batch to meet the demand!

What’s great about this is that you get to make money while doing something you enjoy (hone your skills even!), and that in itself is already gratifying.

Learn to let go
When I started my K-Pop collection, I thought I will never part with any of the items I’ve got. Albums, posters, magazines – name it, I probably have it. Or at some point, I did, because I’ve sold some of them now.

Yes. I hear you. How could I?

To be honest, it took me a while before I decided to put some of the merch I had on sale. I had a hard time acquiring them, they cost a lot, and they reminded me of the good ol’ times when I was head over heels in love with the artists they feature. But the thing is, they just take up space. I touched most of them only once, and that was when I took them out of their packaging. Some even remained unopened!

It then occured to me that, perhaps, they’re better off with other fans, who would actually use them and not just stash them, away and out of sight. So I took pictures of the items, posted them on Twitter and various K-Pop buy-and-sell groups on Facebook, and waited for interested buyers.

While I didn’t get the same amount I bought the items for, I got part of my money back, made some fans happy, and cleared a bit of space for future (hopefully useful) purchases.

Take care of yourself.
You might find this a strange tip to include on this list, but hear me out: No matter how tight things can get, you have to take care of yourself first and foremost.

If you think skipping meals or stressing yourself by working overtime regularly is the answer to your money woes, you’re wrong. You’re only making things worse for yourself, and the last thing you’d want to spend on are hospital fees and medication. So no matter how cliché the saying “health is wealth” is, believe in it.

Find ways to make saving up fun
Saving up isn’t exactly the most exciting phrase out there, so why not spice up your game with money challenges that will make saving money more fun for you? From saving an amount in increments to saving a particular Peso bill, there are several challenges that financial advisors highly recommend and swear by. Feel free to look them up online, choose what you think is the most doable for you, and jump right into it!

So that’s pretty much it! I know that tips are easier said than done, but trust me when I say that your hard work will pay off, and once you achieve your goal, it would be one of the most rewarding experiences you’ll ever have.


Written by Krew member Andy Flores

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Park Hyung Sik First Love in Manila Fan Meeting

Oppa alert!

Last November 11, 2017 (Saturday) at the Kia Theatre, the idol-turned-actor Park Hyung Sik, held his first ever solo fan meeting in the Philippines. Needless to say, his Filipino fans were thrilled when the official announcement was made by Pulp Live World in September.

Before venturing into acting, Hyung Sik made his debut in 2010 as the main vocalist of the nine-member K-pop boy group ‘ZE:A’, also known as ‘Children of Empire’. Presently, Hyung Sik is more popular on K-dramas as a promising actor.

The fans filled Kia Theater full of screams and awwws. It was indeed the most memorable night Hyung Sik’s fans ever had. The 2-hour long fan meeting, which was divided into segments made them know more of who Park Hyung Shik really is.

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Serenading the crowd with his alluring yet soothing voice, Hyung Sik welcomed his fans with the song ‘Because Of You’, one of the official soundtracks of ‘Strong Woman Do Bong Soon’ in which he starred as the lead actor portraying CEO Ahn Min Hyuk.

After briefly introducing himself to the fans, we got to know more about Hyung Sik as he was asked some questions about his personal life in the first interview segment. Hosting the event was Ms. Kring Elenzano-Kim accompanied by a translator. The LED screen was showing pictures of Hyung Sik’s daily life.

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The first photo shown was Hyung Sik in his elementary school days with his friends. He said the people in the picture are his elementary school friends, but they are still friends until now.

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Next photo was a much older Hyung Sik saluting with his right hand, to which he was asked “What can you say the most rebellious thing you’ve done when you were young?” Hyung Sik said that he has a brother who is 2 years older than him and that his brother was the rebellious one and he wasn’t.

With the third photo, Ms. Kring asked him “What was your dream when you were little?” Hyung Sik said he wanted to become a lawyer or policeman until now but he doesn’t know anything about law. However, he is already contented with his career right now.

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Next question was “How was the young Park Hyung Sik like?” Hyung Sik said that he was a makulit kid and was often scolded by his mother.

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Next question was “If you had a chance to go back in time, what age do you wanna go to?” Hyung Sik said he wanted to go back to November 9, 2017 so he could meet his Filipino fans again.

In his free time, Hyung Sik said he likes to play games and also because he’s good at it. He also likes going to hot spas, travelling, hanging out with friends, and taking selfies. He said that he likes taking pictures everywhere he goes so he has memories of it. He also said that he took a lot of pictures here in the Philippines and he will upload it on his Instagram account.  What’s more is he enjoys doing water activities like fishing, flyboarding, and more.

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Next photo was Hyung Sik wearing his costume in the drama ‘Hwarang’.  He said that his role was heavy because his character was a king that’s why he studied hard for this role.

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He also gave us a sneak peek of his gaming room. He described it like a PC bang or a computer room because of its interior design that looks like a ‘gamer’s lodge’.

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The second segment of the fan meeting was introducing Park Hyung Sik to the Filipino culture. He was given a blue Barong Tagalog (Philippines’ national costume for male) to wear. It was actually a gift from his fans who contributed in buying the elegant piece of clothing. He said it was comfortable to wear.

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He got to try a Filipino dish called sisig and a local beverage called sago’t gulaman. He then explained that in Korea there’s ‘chimaek’ or chicken and maekju (beer). So in the Philippines, the equivalent of ‘chimaek’ must be sisig.

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The Philippines is known for tropical fruits like banana, mango, and papaya but Hyung Sik got to try guyabano and kamias. He said that the guyabano tasted like he ate a lemon, but it was delicious with a sweet and sour taste. Despite the screams when he was about to try the kamias, Hyung Sik took one whole piece of it with his fork and ate it. He was making faces, going around in circles, and on his knees because of the super sour fruit.

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He also tried playing tirador or slingshot, which was used as a weapon in the earlier days. He used it to give souvenir balls with his signature written on it. Truly, the fans who received the signed balls were so lucky.

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He got to learn Filipino phrases and expressions too, like “Para sa tabi lang!”, “Nakakaloka! Ang init!”, “Ang pogi ko diba?”, “Pwede ba kitang ligawan?”, and “Mamahalin kita maging sino ka man”. His pickup and pronunciation was very impressive. The fans were screaming all throughout this segment, especially when he said the last two phrases.

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Moving on to the third segment, six lucky fans were pre-selected through an online contest held by Pulp Live World. These fans sent in their videos acting out as Go Ara and Park Bo Young, two of Hyung Sik’s leading ladies in his dramas. The prize was to reenact scenes from ‘Hwarang: The Poet Warrior’ and ‘Strong WomanDo Bong Soon’ live on stage with Park Hyung Sik himself! The fans’ names were Jannica Marie Cabrera, Kyla Noreen Lescano, Medjugorge Uy for ‘Hwarang’, and Marlo Grace Acosta, Anelrose Li, and Joana Marie Alzor for ‘Strong Woman Do Bong Soon’.

Fans went crazy screaming all over seeing their co-fan holding their idol’s hand, and also being held by him. The dialogue was in Hangul yet they memorized their lines and delivered it as best as they can. Two winners were chosen among them with the help of the live audience. The winners deserved their victory as Park Hyung Sik explained that Joana Marie Azor delivered the lines with great pronunciation and Medjugorge Uy came prepared with his costume on ‘Hwarang’. They received scented candles with Hyung Sik’s pictures on it.

Once again we were serenaded with the song ‘Two People’, one of the official soundtracks of ‘The Heirs’ in which he starred as Jo Myung Soo.

Afterwards, it’s time for fan questions! Fans were given a chance to ask questions about Park Hyung Sik for them to even know more about him. Here are the questions:

  1. If you had more time here in the Philippines, where will you go and what will you do?

I really love the Philippines that’s why when I knew I was going to have a fan meeting here, I wanted to go scuba diving but unfortunately, I only have limited time. Next time, for sure, I’ll do it.

  1. Whenever you doubted yourself or felt like giving up, what is the one thought that kept you going and working towards where you are today?

Whenever I go through hard times, I sing. One of the songs I sing is Park Young Shin’s ‘Give’.

  1. Among all the characters that you portrayed, who do you find the most challenging?

All the characters are really challenging for me, but if I will pick one, maybe ‘Hwarang’ because it is a real story. Except for ‘Hwarang’, my other roles are all fictional.

  1. What do you think your life would be if you are not a celebrity?

To be honest, I really love what I am doing (singing and acting) right now. I’m really happy because of the support I am receiving especially from my Filipino fans. What do you think I should be? A pro gamer? Or maybe a scuba diving teacher? Fisherman?

  1. Among the characters you played, what role do you want to be In real life, and why?

Her question is really interesting. The roles I’ve played are of rich characters. In ‘Hwarang’, I’m a king. In ‘Do Bong Soon’, I’m a CEO. Personally, I want to be Ahn Min Hyuk in ‘Strong Woman Do Bong Soon’.

After that, fans prepared a little something for him. Fans dedicated  videos conveying their love and support for Hyung Sik. He responded to the videos with “Mahal kita. Even though I am still lacking, thank you very much for your support. I will work harder for you all. Let’s go together, okay? Thank you so much.”

There was also a birthday cake to celebrate in advance his 27th birthday on November 16th. The fans all sang him a birthday song. He said that “My birthday is still on November 16 so I did not expect that there will be a surprise. But thank you so much for celebrating my birthday with me. I am so happy. Mahal kita!”

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As much as the fans prepared for the projects for him, Hyung Sik also read aloud his letter for all his Filipino fans. He said he is thankful to his fans for their love and for waiting for him even though they live in far places. He’s happy to have finally visited the Philippines again. He did not expect that his dramas ‘Strong Woman Do Bong Soon’ and ‘Hwarang’ will be famous here in the Philippines. He thanks his fans for their support and he hopes they will like his next project too. Next time, he plans to visit again to go scuba diving and wandering around the city.

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“I won’t forget your laugh and smiles. Please continue to support me as always. Mahal kita and thank you!”

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The fan meeting ended with Park Hyung Sik singing “I’ll Be Here”, one of the OST from ‘Hwarang’, a historical drama where he portrayed Sam Maek Jong, a king-turned-warrior.

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Less than a week has passed after the fan meeting ended, but we can’t wait for you to return, Park Hyung Sik! We’ll be patiently waiting for you!

– Your fans whom you called your Do Bong Soon

This video sums up the highlights of what happened during the fan meeting:

Video credit: Cris Oriarte (crysel101)

Written by Krew Member Nish Salvatierra and KCC intern Raven Esperanza

Photos by Krew Member Chiarra Mogol

Must borrow books to up your K-Vocab! 

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Do you love reading books? With today’s social media craze and it’s-all-on-youtube mindset, I think some of you don’t. Well, let me tell you one thing, if you want to improve your Korean language skills you need to get back to the basics! Read.

Reading a book not only allows you to focus (since it has no “other tab”) but also allows you to improve your grammar- since you’ll be familiarized with the sentence constructions. If you read books aloud, you can even practice your speech. What more if those books were in Korean? It’s the answer to all your Hangeul dilemmas.

No subtitles?

Want me to talk to a Korean?

TOPIK exam?

No problem!

Here are some of the must borrow books from the KCC Library to help you up your K-vocab!

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1. Language Books.

Obviously, Korean text books are the first ones to help your Korean language skills! If you’re studying in KCC, you’re probably familiar with GANADA. If you heard about Ewha’s intensive language program, guess what, KCC has Ewha books up to Vol. 8! (I went crazy over this!) They also have TOPIK (Test of Proficiency in Korean) reviewers. Most of these books are only available at the KCC Library and seldom (to none) at our local Philippine bookstores.

So far, all the books that I saw were “foreigner friendly”;  offering colored prints, translations and easy conversational dialogues. Of course say farewell to those cartoon-characters and english letters as the book’s volume number go higher!

You can also test what you’ve learned through the available workbooks there but, be sure to write it on a scratch paper- the book ain’t yours!

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2. Children’s Books. 

When you got your Hangeul ready, the best way to practice your reading skills is through children’s books. Yes, it maybe “Three Little Pigs” but it’s better than reading a random Korean pamphlet about Jjajangmyeon! Start small and be steady. Children’s books are the first step to Korean language greatness. Remember this: today’s best linguists started from children’s books, therefore, reading them is not a shame.

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3. Any book.

If you didn’t know, the KCC Library has around 6,000 selection of books and media titles, 50% of which are in English. Anybody can really learn about the K-culture it they wanted to! Still the other 50% are in Korean. Isn’t that great? More books to practice reading! Eventually after all the basics, it’s time to move on from easy. To improve you have to be challenged. You can start from recipe books if you love to cook; entertainment books for K-pop enthusiasts and many more.

Take note:

To borrow you must first be a member of the KCC Library. Bring the needed requirements such as the filled-up membership form (available at the KCC Library), any size of your photo (not a poster, please) and a photocopy of any valid ID. Applying for a regular membership would have a fee of P200 (P100 for students), valid for a year, allowing you to borrow 2 books for 7 days, have access to CD & DVD collections and use the library computer for 2 hours.

If you’re enrolled in a any KCC Class, there’s no need to pay for the membership fee for the duration of your term. You get to borrow 1 book for 7 days, have access to CD & DVD collections and use the library computer for 2 hours.

Borrowers and students must deposit a refundable P300 per book, upon check-out. Overdue penalty is P20 a book, per day.

For more inquiries visit the KCC Library at the Mancor Corporate Building, 2/F 32nd St, Taguig or call us at 555-1711.

God bless!

Written by Krew Member Max Chua

De La Salle Lipa Rides the Korean W​ave

The Korean Cultural Center (KCC) in the Philippines has always hosted culture caravans from various schools and organizations in Metro Manila, but this time, KCC went farther! For the first time, Korean Cultural Center visited Batangas for its culture caravan.

As of date, the biggest K-Culture Caravan took place at Sentrum, De La Salle Lipa, Batangas last October 19, 2017, with over 2,000 students participating in the whole day K-affair!

If you’re not familiar with Korean Culture Caravans, it is an event hosted in cooperation with schools to bring love and passion for Korean history and culture. Activities may vary from schools depending on the request, but the motivation remains the same – to cultivate Korean activities and make sure that faculty and students alike are given a chance to express, rediscover, and embrace the quintessence of graceful Korean culture and beauty.

The whole event was divided in five parts: 1) Film Screening featuring introduction to Korean culture, 2) Lecture on the Basics of the Korean Language, 3) Lecture on Mooninhwa (Korean Traditional Art), 4) Performances from DLSL Salindayaw Dance Troupe, Venisse Siy, and PHP, 5) Raffle Draw of special Korean goods. These events were repeated for the two batches of students who came and enjoyed the show.

The film screening taught students the Korean basic words – how they can say and write it. After this, teacher Lee Chunghee reviewed the words shown in the film as well as gave tips on how to study Hangul (Korean Alphabet), concepts, values, and customs. She even encouraged the students to visit sejonghakdang.org to know more about the lesson she introduced.

Subsequently, teacher Yoon Donghyun demonstrated the traditional Korean art of Mooninhwa and discussed the simple aesthetic themes incorporating poetry, calligraphy, and illustrations with dramatic simplicity. Mooninhwa shows vigor vividness and the feeling of a brush.

Later on, after a short break, three performances were revealed to the audiences. The performances showed how the cutting-edge music of Korea changes from traditional to modern. It really is a glimpse of experience beyond K-pop and K-dramas.

The last part of the event might be the most exciting as fans and those who are new to the K-culture got the chance to receive special prizes such as Essential Korean Grammar, Etiquette Guide to Korea, Pyeongchang 2018 Notepad, to name a few.

KCC booth was also present at the venue and had its own raffle promo where major prices such as Twice Ceci Poster (with the signature of all members!), The Heirs OST Album, and Song Joongki Poster were given away. All of the activities wouldn’t be complete without the photo booth at the event as well as the Hanbok experience booth where various students and faculty lined up to dress up and take photos on the set.

Interested to have an incredible experience like this? Email KCC at kccphcaravan@gmail.com or call at 555-1711. Your school might be the next stop for our extraordinary caravan!

Written by Krew Member Jean Singian

Every performance is a show-stopper at this year’s BEYOND BORDERS: ASEAN-KOREA Dance Exchange!

From K-pop, K-cuisine, and K-brands, Filipinos have always encountered and experienced diverse aspects of Korean culture. To celebrate the milestones of the 50th anniversary of Southeast Nations and the ASEAN-Korea Cultural Exchange Year, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) in partnership with the Korean Cultural Center (KCC) in the Philippines organized “Beyond Borders: ASEAN-Korea Dance Exchange” which took place at Star Theater, CCP Complex, Roxas Boulevard last October 20, 2017.

The culmination dance showcase started with the Philippine anthem, Korean anthem, and the ASEAN anthem. It was attended by diplomats from Cambodia, Indonesia, Iran, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, Oman, Korea and the Philippines. The said culmination was also made possible with the unwavering support of Ballet Manila through Ballet Manila CEO and Artistic Director Lisa Macuja-Elizalde.

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From Left: Korean Ambassador KIM Jae Shin, Ballet Manila through Ballet Manila CEO and Artistic Director Lisa Macuja-Elizalde, Wife of Korean Ambassador Madame LEE Jong Min and Korean Cultural Center of the Philippines Director LEE Jincheol

Ms. Adelina Suemith, OIC-Executive Director of NCCA shared on her introduction that the rich and vibrant culture of Korea can be best manifested through dance as it encompasses physical boundaries. Despite many differences, similarity happens during dance as it plays a radical role to show beyond traditional forms. This event was hosted in order to break new grounds for mutual understanding and respect between different cultures, magnifying the world with new perspectives and as the ambassador of Korea, Mr. Kim Jae-Shin aptly said, “It is not much of what we can do but who we will become in the future of the world.” He also mentioned that ASEAN is one of Korea’s key partners with its economic operations, people to people exchange, and cultural exchange.

Moving forward to the highlights of the show, the entire program showcased ballet which originated in the 15th century, specifically in Italy. It has developed in a fine art form which was visible in the fourteen (14) performances of graceful expressions, symmetry, fast movements as well as pure movement and physical expression. The night was the most spectacular manifestation of classical to neoclassical to contemporary dance, the fast-shifting movements of the performances added to the suspense and charm of the show. Take a look at the photos and performance recap below!

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  1. Sotto Voce – Choreography by Augustus “Bam” Damian III and music by Pachelbel’s Canon D in Major
  • Performed by Abigail Oliveiro (Singapore), Heewon Cho (Korea), Nanami Hasegawa (Japan), Violet Hong (Malaysia), Jihyeon Jang (Korea), and Resti Octaviani (Indonesia)
  • It showed how countries make connections, one by one, and how they harmonize each other through caring and helping each other.
  1. Rum Klong Yao (Thailand) – Music and choreography by Ministry of Culture of Thailand, Fine Arts Department
  • Performed by Narissa Porsawat and Nattachai Junlaworn
  • There’s no rush in love can best describe this performance.
  1. Morions (Philippines)– Choreography by Gerardo Francisco and music by Jessie Lucas
  • Performed by John De Dios, Rudy De Dious, Anselmo Dictado, Gerardo Francisco, Elpidio Magat, Romeo Peralta, Glenn Ragel, and Alvin Santos
  • This dance was astonishing with its highlight on how warriors leap, fly, and are just basically everywhere. The engaging warrior music and the fluidity of their moves were unstoppable.
  1. Pi Khroy KA Rom Roborsh Khnom (Behind my Dance – Cambodia ) – Choreography by Nam Narim and music by Ros Sokunthea
  • Performed by Nam Narim and Chanlyka Leav
  • This featured a lot of striking poses, from slow to fast, then gaining momentum again.
  1. Sayao Sa Pamlang (Philippines) – Choreography by Agnes Locsin and music by Bob Aves
  • Performed by Marinette Franco, Alvin Dictado, Rafael Perez, Rodney Catubay, John Carl Concepcion, Joshua Enciso, and Raymond Salcedo
  • This emphasized the use of bamboos and how folks from the early era believed that this dance helps drive away evil.
  1. Eclectic Shift (Malaysia) – Choreography by Mohd Yunus Ismail and Suhaili Micheline and music by Mat Mos
  • Performed by Chong Hoei Tzin and Mohd Shafiq Bin
  • This is a traditional Malaysian dance that depicts a sense of relationships, conflict and resolutions, companionship and competition between performers.
  1. Kinabuhing Mananagat (Philippines) – Choreography by Rudy De Dios and music by Visayan Folk Songs
  • Performed by Pia Dames, Rudy de Dios, John de Dios, Elpidio Magat, Glenn Ragel, and Alvin Santos
  • This performance depicted the life of fisher folks in the Visayas area accompanied by the fun music. Together with this, it also emphasized how Waray women are when they are in love – strong and fearless.
  1. Arachnida (Philippines) – Choreography by Agnes Locsin and music by Fagher
  • Performed by Joan Emery Sia and Romeo Peralta
  • It is a fascinating illustration of how spiders mate. Complicated stunts were made to look easy and one can see how the performers were one in their movements.
  1. Lui (Adventure Mission – Thailand ) – Choreography by Nattachai Junlaworn and music by Taylor Davis
  • Performed by Narissa Porsawat and Nattachai Junlaworn
  • An excellent performance mirroring the hardship of going through a difficult mission and successfully overcoming it.
  1. White Swan Adagio (Singapore and Philippines) – Choreography by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa and music by Peter Tchaikovsky
  • Performed by Abigail Oliverio and Mark Sumayo
  • The Swan Lake has been present for more than 130 years and is without question one of the greatest Romantic ballets in the ballet repertoire.
  1. Reve (Philippines) – Choreography by Ernest Mandap and music by Metallica as performed by Apocalyptica entitled “Nothing Else Matters”
  • Performed by Rudy De Dios and Gerardo Francisco
  • It is a journey of two men as they reach their dreams (Reve is the French word for dreams) together, no one is left behind.
  1. Muro Ami (Philippines) – Choreography by Gerardo Francisco and Music by Hanz Zimmer
  • Performed by Elyssabeth Apilado, Shaira Comeros, Kayla Coseteng, Marinette Franco, Monique Valera, Jefferson Balute, Rodney Catubay, John Carl Concepcion, Alvin Dictado, Joshua Enciso, Rafael Perez, and Raymond Salcedo.
  • Muro Ami is also one of the oldest but still relevant issues of the absolute portrayal of child labor in the high seas as they are being used in the illegal fishing system.
  1. Peung Ryu (Taste of the Arts – South Korea) – Choreography by Park So Jung and Ryu Seouk Hun and music by Ryu In Sang
  • Performed by Park So Jung and Ryu Seouk Hun
  • This performance shattered expectations and brings South Korea to stage accompanied by infused traditional music.
  1. Full Cast danced to Tinikling
  • Each representative of each country danced to Tinikling together with the Filipinos. The beat, tapping, and sliding showed how participants became one in their goal to promote the partnership between the countries.

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The event ended with the creative director and Lisa Macuja-Elizalde waving and dancing together with the whole ASEAN-Korea Dance Exchange Crew. Indeed, the night was filled with spectacular performances and there are no doubt partnerships between participating countries will only grow stronger!

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Written by Krew Member Jean Singian

Easy K-Pop-Inspired Outfits You and Your Squad Can Rock This Halloween

Ghoulish shop window displays… an overstock of sweets at the supermarket… horror movie marathons scheduled to air on tv – there’s no denying that Halloween is upon us! And as the party invites and announcements pour in, most of us are left with a huge, almost debilitating question: What should I wear?

Well, if you and your friends are loud and proud K-Pop fans, this is a dilemma you shouldn’t even be dealing with! Go all out and make a grand entrance at your school or office party, channeling your favorite idols! After all, this season is no longer limited to dressing up in terrifying costumes (I came across a taco suit and a Cup Noodles costume just now, and they’re everything but scary).

SHINee - Halloween

To help you decide, we rounded up some fun K-Pop-inspired “costumes” that you and your squad can rock this Halloween, without fussing over complicated ensembles or looking a bit ~too~ casual.

Trust us when we say that these outfits are so easy to put together, you might even have some of the pieces in your wardrobe!

TWICE_Cheer Up

“Cheer Up”
Inspired by: Twice

A pack of peppy cheerleaders sporting “uniforms” in contrasting hues of yellow and purple, Twice shows their school spirit, exuding a fun and youthful vibe for “Cheer Up.”

TWICE - Cheer Up

Outfit Essentials
-Black sports bra
-Purple varsity jacket with white sleeves
-Stretchy high-waisted black shorts
-Sneakers (Twice wore Nike Dunk Hi 08 shoes, but you can go for any comfy sneakers that look similar)
-Vintage tube socks in black, white, yellow, or purple
-Snapback cap
-Pink pompoms (to bring on the cheer, of course!)

f(x)_Red Light

“Rebelles
Inspired by: f(x)

Not a fan of perky cheerleaders? Perhaps, you’d like to go for an edgier look like what f(x) rocked in “Red Light.” An interesting play of textures in dark and muted tones, their getup will surely unleash the rebel in you.

f(x) - Rebelles

Outfit Essentials
-Distressed t-shirt cut-offs
-Black camisole
-Crop top/bustier
-Distressed dark denim shorts
-Camouflage shorts
-High-waisted black shorts
-Black tights/fishnet stockings/knee-high socks
-Wide-brimmed black flat top hat
-Net arm sleeves/fingerless gloves
-Combat boots/strappy platform sandals

Wonder Girls_Nobody

“Retro Chic”
Inspired by: Wonder Girls

Wonder Girls are hands down the queens of retro in the K-Pop world. Pulling off the fashion (and sound) of the yesteryears so effortlessly, they’re the perfect group to draw some inspo from when it comes to donning the vintage look.

Wonder Girls - Retro Chic

Outfit Essentials
-Sheath dress with bold patterns (either long or short-sleeved)
-Solid-colored tights
-Solid-colored high-heel shoes
-Hoop/dangling geometric earrings in bright colors

Crayon Pop_Bar Bar

“Scoot Away”
Inspired by: Crayon Pop

Call their costumes silly, but since Crayon Pop’s quirkiness received a nod of approval from Mother Monster Lady Gaga herself, there’s nothing much left to argue about here. Just like what their group’s name suggests, Crayon Pop’s “Bar Bar Bar” outfits come in cheery bursts of color that will make you and your friends stand out in the party.

Crayon Pop - Scoot Away

Outfit Essentials
-Bright-colored track jacket
-Matching track shorts
-Black tights
-White sneakers
-White gloves
-Scooter helmet (you CAN’T miss the most iconic piece in their getup!)

SEVENTEEN_Aju Nice

“Old-School Charmers”
Inspired by: SEVENTEEN

A great example of “not too complicated or too casual,” SEVENTEEN’s “Aju Nice” costumes are as charming and playful as the funky track they’re assembled for. Needless to say, this is best worn with your pack of bros.

SEVENTEEN - Old-School Charmers

Outfit Essentials
-Long-sleeved button-up white shirt/white graphic tee
-Black slacks/denim jeans
-Red/black suspenders
-White socks
-Black and white Oxfords/black sneakers

EXO_Power

“Galactic Rangers”
Inspired by: EXO

We saw EXO on a mission in a galactic wasteland, battling a robot that took away their supernatural abilities  in “Power,” which is arguably the group’s most rollicking music video yet. Veering away from their usually chic and sexy styles, they went for military-themed outfits.

EXO - Galactic Rangers

Outfit Essentials
-Camouflage/black/olive green bomber jackets
-Plain black/black and white checked t-shirt
-Cargo pants/distressed jeans/black jeans
-Combat boots/sneakers
-Tactical harness and goggles
-Black cadet cap
-Prop toy guns (believe it or not, EXO used customized Nerf guns in the MV)

SHINee_Married To The Music

“Odd Party”
Inspired by: SHINee

No K-Pop music video screams “Halloween party” quite like SHINee’s “Married to the Music.” Known for their unique and fashion-forward concepts, the quintet stepped up their game in their summer 2015 release, which turned out to be a surprisingly macabre MV, reminiscent of the 1975 cult classic “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.”

SHINee - Odd Party

Outfit Essentials
-Bright-colored jacket/blazer (feel free to accentuate it with patches)
-Heavily-printed/graphic tee
-Distressed jeans/bright-colored dress pants
-Lace-up black shoes/combat boots
-Vintage socks
-Animal print snapback cap
-Scarf/sweatband (to be worn on the forehead)
-Dark-rimmed glasses
-Prop skeleton hand or wooden hand model (to be placed in pockets, with phalanges peeking)

Got anything else to add? Sound off in the comments!

Written by Krew member Andy Flores

Colours of Autumn—What is it like in Korea?

Inviting and beyond beautiful—that’s how I describe Korea. The warm people, scenic places, array of tempting food, trendy music and fashion, values–rich dramas and remarkably advanced technology are just some of the many reasons why Korea is a must on your travel bucket list. But what’s more interesting about the country is its four distinctively unique seasons: the spring (봄), summer (여름), autumn (가을) and winter (겨울).

Colours of Autumn in Korea
Korea is an invitingly beautiful country that besides the warm people, beautiful places and rich culture, what’s more interesting is its four distinctively unique seasons: the spring, summer, autumn and winter.

Korea is especially more beautiful during the autumn when trees change into palettes of yellow, red orange and brown. The autumn season, which lasts from the months of September until late of November, is considered by many as the most pleasant time of the year. Beautiful autumn hues paint the entire nation with golden ginkgoes, coppery–orange zelkovas and red maple trees under the clear blue sky along with the cool weather is such breathtaking scenery to enjoy and appreciate.

The National Museum of Korea is also a great place to enjoy the autumn season as its surroundings are ornamented with beautiful autumnal trees.

During the fall foliage’s intense colors, Koreans are looking forward to the beautiful season and spend time with their family outdoors, whether just a casual visit at city parks or hiking at one of the country’s famous peaks.

Autumn in Korea is a time of falling leaves which paints the entire nation with vibrant yellow, red orange and brown.

With the royal palaces, mountains and other popular attractions carpeted with spectacular fall foliage, each year the season continue to attract crowds of people. Situated in the city of Sokcho, the Seoraksan National Park is one of the most well–known autumn foliage destinations to visit to where you get to see and experience the grandeur of autumn in Korea. The picturesque park is incredibly famous amongst mountain climbers not just because of its many trails and granite summits but as well as the sceneries that can only be seen during the season. Nami Island, which is gracefully floating in the Cheongpyeong Lake and just 63 kilometers away from Seoul, is also famous for its piles of vibrant foliage during the autumn, not to mention the magnificent Ginkgo Tree Footpath and the Metasequoia Lane, which were the famed locations of the hit Korean drama, “Winter Sonata.”

Appreciate the Namsan Mountain’s splendid autumn by riding the cable car up to the view deck grounds of the iconic N Seoul Tower.
The peeping N Seoul Tower that proudly stands tall on the captivating peak of Mt. Namsan.
The autumn-painted inviting city of Seoul as seen at the top of the Namsan tower.

Downtown of the inviting city of Seoul, it’s no excuse not to visit the captivating peak of Mt. Namsan in the autumn. Crowned by the iconic N Seoul Tower, the mountains and its surrounding park lure trekkers, backpackers and tourists alike to witness the splendid changing of the season in the heart of Seoul. Setting aside the worthy hike, visitors can also appreciate the season through the Namsan cable car that awaits them from and to, and vice versa, right to the view deck while enjoying the stretch of thick and crimson–colored bushes of old maple and pine trees.

Witness the royal guard changing ceremony at the Gwanghwamun gate of the Gyeongbok Palace in which in the Joseon era it’s traditionally held at different times of the day.
In hanbok, the traditional clothing of Koreans, travel through time with free admissions to Korea’s grand palaces across the city of Seoul.
The Hyangwonjeong Pavilion stands lovely on the artificial Hyangwonji island within a garden lake and has the wooden Chwihyanggyo bridge that connects it to the Gyeongbokgung palace grounds.

Grand palaces built during the reign of Joseon Dynasty are also great destinations to see the season’s colorful transformation as they are all majestic in the fall. Like the road along the Deoksugung Palace’s stone wall ornamented with tall ginkgoes, the traditional structures of the Gyeongbokgung Palace in a backdrop of impressive red and gold landscapes, the tranquil lotus pond of the Changdeokgung Palace adorned with autumnal leaves alongside the Huwon garden, and the notable Korean Folk Village which is as well stunning during the fall charm artists, photographers and tourists alike from across the country. Moreover, a walk and forest bath to the Seoul Grand Park is another way to embrace the nature and enjoy the scent of the autumn trees. If you just want to explore the metropolitan city of Korea, Seoul is just a huge autumn foliage landscape wherein lovely spots, gardens and parks are quite colorful places to visit and stroll about.

Besides the time of falling leaves, autumn in Korea is also the season of bountiful harvests as mandarin oranges, apples, pears and persimmons ripen and add color to the foliage.

Korean fall is not only about the time of falling leaves and a sign before the cold winter sets in but also it’s the season of bountiful harvests. The rice fields started to turn to tints of gold while the sweet jujubes, apples, pears, and persimmons, which is a symbol of autumn in Korea, are all ripening and add rich color to the foliage.

With the crisp, cool weather that the autumn breeze brings, it’s best to enjoy the season’s fresh and bountiful harvests including some of the most tempting traditional food in a hanok-style Korean restaurant.
During the autumn season, Koreans are looking forward to the annual traditional holiday of Chuseok in which it’s not only celebrated as thanksgiving but most especially a custom to pay respect to their great ancestors. Photo shown is the charye-sang, a table setting for the ancestor worship ceremony during the Korean Thanksgiving Day. (© Official Flickr page of the Republic of Korea)

Furthermore, another reason to enjoy Korea’s autumn season is the holidays and many festivals that are lined-up particularly for the public to delight in and appreciate. Chuseok, as one of the exciting festivities, is an annual traditional holiday and a major harvest festival that every Korean celebrates not just for thanksgiving but most especially to pay respect to their ancestors. It’s held around the autumn equinox, the season’s biggest custom is also a feast of Korean traditional food and beverages such as the sweet songpyeon rice cakes as representative food, hangwa and sindoju. Also, the holiday is a celebration of old traditional games including archery and the Korean wrestling ssireum, along with the folk dance ganggangsullae.

Seasonal sweet hotteok pancakes filled with various nuts are a must-try delicacy and street food in Korea especially in the fall.

Aside from the customary offerings, roasted chestnuts and ginkgo nuts as well as the hotteok which is a seasonal sweet pancake filled with mixed nuts are best enjoyed in the fall and a must-try Korean street food enticingly serve by the street vendors called pojangmacha.

Array of beautifully-seasoned kimchi sold at a traditional market in Tongyeong.

One more reason why autumn is an exciting season in Korea is the Kimjang, in which it’s the traditional way of making the kimchi wherein Korean families usually gather in group to prepare and make the healthy fermented dish. Kimchi made in the fall is said by many Koreans to be the best kimchi to serve all throughout the year.

The Andong Maskdance Festival, one of the most exciting autumn festivals in Korea, showcases the folk dance heritage and cultural mask dances of the country. (© Official Flickr page of the Republic of Korea)

The season wouldn’t be more exciting without the celebration of the autumn festivals such as the Andong Maskdance Festival showcasing the folk dance heritage and cultural mask dances of Korea, and the Suncheon Bay Reeds Festival which naturally showcases the charming fields of brown reeds which are also home to rare birds and other wildlife. Besides, the much-awaited celebration of the Seoul Lantern Festival which lights up the downtown Seoul to a glistening paradise, particularly the Cheonggyecheon Stream, with hundreds of colorful, uniquely designed and well–lit lanterns.

Fascinating fall foliage of Mt. Namsan in vibrant colors as seen from the observatory of the N Seoul Tower.
Golden-yellow ginkgo leaves start to carpet the streets as autumn fade in late of November. (© Korea Clickers—Official Facebook page of the Republic of Korea)
Just few steps away from the beautiful summit of Mt. Mireuk in Tongyeong. It’s worth noting that Korean autumn is as well the perfect season to go for a hike but expect showers ahead of your climb.

Autumn foliage in Korea is without doubt a magnificent spectacle. But whichever season you choose to travel to, you will definitely going to have a great time exploring the lovely countryside of Korea all year round.

 

Written by Krew Member Jap Vergonia