Window of Pain and Glory; DMZ Docs Film Fest

“How humane can we be as a human?”

Not your traditional Korean and mainstream storyline, variety of characters from the seven internationally-acclaimed documentary films opened our eyes on the sensitive issues brought by the divided peninsula of Korea. These films were screened last May 11 to 13 during the Manila leg of DMZ Docs Korean Film Festival held at the Cine Adarna UPFI Film Center Diliman.

Mrs. B., A North Korean Woman

The film ‘Mrs. B a North Korean Woman’ by director Jero Yun, who graced the opening day, rejuvenated the atmosphere of the theater as it officially kicked off the series of documentaries for the festival. Yun’s film revolved around a North Korean who escaped from her motherland, became a human trafficker in China and eventually tried to see asylum in South Korea. The film gained loads of applause as the story ended with a melodramatic tune coming from Mrs. B.

“To inform the public about Korea’s other side through film and visual arts”

After the screening, Korean Cultural Center Director Lee Jin Cheol informed the audience that the Philippine leg of DMZ International Documentary Film festival aims to display the enormous desire of Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) to be remembered as a landmark of peace for the two Koreas who are currently facing political issues.

Following are remarks from UP Film Institute Director Sari Raissa Dalena who noted that the selection of films will make known how the country deals with contemporary issues governing Korea and how such films contribute in cultural exchange.

A rundown of commentaries made by Patrick Campos, Director of the Office of Research and Publication of the College of Mass Communication of the University of the Philippines (UP), remind everyone the importance of human subjects as the base of national interest.

Wrapping up the opening ceremony was a talk made by Director Yun himself who gave his best, to answer all the points of interest by the viewers. He also admitted that the story of Mrs. B whom they refer as Madame B during the shoot made a huge impact in his view as a filmmaker and encouraged him to produce a ‘better’ film and at some point made him feel more humane.

Categorically, we may answer the question “How humane can we be as a human?” by simply explaining science theories or stating the good deeds we do for others. However, films like the ones featured in DMZ International Film Festival might also prove that your thinking might be the other way around. See how suffering and survival can make one humane and how perspective could build a strong character inside as a human.

Written by Krew Member Mikai Javier

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