ALL SET FOR PYEONGCHANG WINTER OLYMPICS 2018

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The long wait is over as the much awaited PyeongChang Winter Olympics 2018 has finally started. This multi-sport event will run for 17 days from February 09 to 25 of this year. With over 2,900 athletes coming from 95 countries who will then compete in 15 sports disciplines, this huge event is surely something you would not want to miss. As this is Korea’s first time to host the Winter Olympics, we can expect nothing but great preparations done for it.

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To celebrate the opening of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, The Korean Cultural Center in the Philippines held a special screening event last February 09, 2018 at the KCC Wave Hall. People from all walks of life heartily enjoyed the back-to-back screening of the movies, Take Off and Run Off which portray how the first national ski jump and female ice hockey teams of South Korea were made.

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Apart from the film viewing, attendees were also able to have a good time through the games prepared during the event. One of the games involved having the contestants identify the participating countries based on the flags shown. Still in relation to the ongoing Winter Olympics, the goal of the second game was for the players to name the particular sport discipline being flashed on screen. The lucky winners received adorable plushies of the Winter Olympics and Winter Paralympics mascots – Sooharang and Bandabi. The rest of the contenders did not go home empty-handed as they took home cute keychains of the said Winter Olympic mascots.

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Because of this special event set by the Korean Cultural Center in the Philippines, more Filipinos gained a better grasp of what the Winter Olympics is all about. The attendees in particular expressed their excitement and appreciation for the said multi-sport event.

“I gained more interest in this year’s Winter Olympics. I never thought the Philippines even have representatives for it.” – Anjie, 26

“I really enjoyed the movies. They game me an idea on what to expect on the Winter Olympics.” – Troy, 19

“I learned about the sports events which I was unfamiliar with. Some sports are quite new to me.” – Megan, 16

“As an athlete myself, I appreciate the characters’ hard work to bring glory to their country.” – Carl,23

“The movies sparked my interest to follow the games in PyeongChang Winter Olympics. I really cried on the second movie.” – Marian, 32

“This makes me want to go to Korea and watch the actual games.” – Destiny, 37

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Passion. Connected.
– That motto of the Winter Olympics was truly felt that night as people gathered together in enjoyment. In the spirit of this year’s Winter Olympics, let us not forget to cheer for our very own Philippine representatives, Michael Martinez for men’s figure skating and Asa Miller for men’s alpine skiing.

To all the other delegates, fighting!

Once again, congratulations to South Korea for hosting this year’s Winter Olympics.

To know more about the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, you may visit http://www.pyeongchang2018.com

Photos and Article by Cham Hidalgo

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Korean Sool: A Culture to Share

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‘Gonbae!’ (Cheers! 건배!)

The fun that Korean drinking culture could bring is undeniable. The popularity of this culture gets stronger as K-dramas are now in mainstream media and it display how drinking bind families and friends together up to the present. Well, Korean alcoholic drinks are more than just the popular green bottle that we often see on screen. To introduce more about these beverages to Filipinos, a special exhibit on Korean Sool (한국의  술) was launched last February 8 in Korean Cultural Center’s exhibit hall.

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A walk into Korean sool’s history

Ms. Jisung Chun, a Korean rice liquor sommelier and founder of Soy and Rice, curated the program and discussed on Korea’s history of sool (alcoholic beverage) from the three Kingdom period up to present. As well, Anju (Korean food served alongside with alcohol) and varieties of sool were introduced.

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During the talk, Sool has been presented as an essential item for ancestor offering and entertaining guests. To give a little background on its types, Makgeolli is a slightly sweet and milky white beverage with an alcoholic concentration of about less than 10%. Takju, are the refined ones, almost the same ones with Yakju but can be defined by the clarity of the beverage, both has a concentration of about 10-19%. Last is the Soju which is the most popular ones, this undergoes the process of distillation and can easily be defined since it’s clear. Among all these beverages, it has the highest alcohol contents of about 19%-73%.

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Ms. Chun also gave recommendations on which ‘pulutan’ (snacks) would fit each type of drink. To give it a complete package experience, six among the types of sool were luckily tried by the audience and that includes the Horangyi (Tiger) Makgeolli, Tok Sseonin Bokbunja Makgeolli, Loa Red 19, Sanyang Sansam Gadeun Byul, Wangju and Uri Ssal Makgeolli.

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A tour on the exhibit hall followed right after the opening ceremony and talk. The seven areas display the History of Sool, which was earlier discussed during the conference. The second one is the Ingredients of Korean sool, followed by the brewing process, categories of Korean sool, Korean drinking rules and etiquette,  Jooansang (the traditional styled table served with Anju and sool). Lastly, Jeongja (pavillion) and soolsang, a perfect photo area to complete your Korea feel.

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To make the whole experience a memorable one, attendees got to try how to make Makgeolli first hand!  They say home brewed Makgeolli has the best flavor! Here’s a quick recap on the process.

Ingredients:

Rice (that could fill at least half of the jar when cooked)

Water (enough to cover the rice)

Nuruk (40-50 grams)

Instructions:

  1. Wash Korean rice until the water used is already clear.
  2. Steam for about 40 mins.
  3. Let it cool for 2-3 hours.
  4. In a jar, put the cooled rice, nuruk and water together.
  5. Mix.
  6. Make sure the jar is half lid open so the moisture would go out.
  7. On the 4th day, close it totally.
  8. You may try it on the 10th day. (It is expected that the mixture is a little sweet but if you want a more concentrate one, add five more days on the fermentation process.)

Korean Sool is more than just drinking liquor itself. It’s a fun culture shared by many. Make sure to drop by and visit KCC to see the exhibit yourself!

“Korean Sool” exhibition is open to the public for free from 9AM to 5PM Monday to Saturday at the KCC Exhibition Hall starting February 8, 2018. For more information, contact (02) 555-1711 or email curator@koreanculture.ph

Written by Krew Member Mikay Javier

K-Dramas of 2017 That You Should Binge-Watch Before The Year Ends

Because This Is My First Life

The year is quickly drawing to a close, but not without addictive K-Dramas that kept us glued to our screens for hours and hours almost everyday!

Of course, you’ve heard about 2017’s biggest hits like the cinematographically stunning Goblin (okay, it premiered in 2016, but it emerged as one of this year’s most popular dramas), the cute Weightlifting Fairy Kim Bok-joo that got us asking “Do you like Messi?”, and the super kilig Fight for My Way. In fact, you’ve probably watched those shows and still can’t get over them to this very day. Don’t worry, a lot of fans can relate!

But let me break to you now that this post is not about this year’s most talked-about Korean dramas. Here, I am rounding up seven underappreciated yet seriously good series from 2017 that you most definitely have to check out before we ring in another year of crack K-Dramas:

Circle: Two Worlds Connected

Circle

Okay, so what we have here are two brothers (Yoo Jin Goo and Ahn Woo Yeon) in search of their missing father and a beautiful alien named “Byul” (Gong Seung Yeon), who they believe carries the answers they have long been looking for. The second half of each episode features a ~perfect~ world some time in the future, where citizens’ memories have been erased and emotions are controlled through cutting-edge technology under a new centralized government headed by a secretive official, who has a shared past with the brothers. Intensely suspenseful with edge-of-your-seat twists and thrills, this dystopian sci-fi drama is unforgiving. While watching, put your theories on hold. Or better yet, just dismiss them all. They’re most likely wrong anyway.

Save Me

Save Me

The life of Sang Mi (Seo Ye Ji) has never been easy, but things have yet to become difficult for her. When her family is invited to join a cult by a charismatic leader who goes by the title “Spiritual Father,” her gullible father – who was recently scammed by a colleague – didn’t even take a second to hesitate and said yes. Living in the company of brainwashed followers (including her parents) who think she is the answer to their salvation, Sang Mi is determined to escape, leading her to seek the help of guilt-stricken Sang Hwan (2PM’s Taecyeon) and wrongfully-accused Dong Chul (Woo Do Hwan) to save her.

“Save Me” won’t leave you be. It is terrifying as it is disturbing – but in a good way. It bravely tackles an unconventional subject and jabs audiences with bits and pieces of hidden realities that are both eye-opening and thought-provoking.

Star of the Universe

Star of the Universe

The first part (and the best) of MBC’s “Three Colors of Fantasy” trilogy, “Star of the Universe” follows young grim reaper Kim Ha Na (Ji Woo), who is a huge fan of struggling has-been soloist Woo Joo (EXO’s Suho). When she finds out that her favorite singer will soon “go up,” Ha Na is faced with a dilemma: Should she fulfill her duty and collect Woo Joo’s soul or defy the rules and save the only man she loves? A story about music, second chances, and first love, “Star of the Universe” packs all the feels in just three episodes, leaving you in fits of laughter one moment and in tears the next. Here’s a tip: Grab a box of tissues before binge-watching. Trust me, you’ll need it.

Chicago Typewriter

Chicago Typewriter

Yoo Ah In, Im Soo Jung, and Go Kyung Pyo take on double roles for “Chicago Typewriter” as witers in Japanese colonial era Korea in the 1930s and as a best-selling writer plagued by depression, a literary fanatic, and a genius jazz-loving writer in the present.

This intellectually crafted story about literatis in the past whose reincarnated lives cross paths again in the present is unlike any other K-Drama you’ve seen before, and its historical roots make it all the more interesting. Prepare your heart, because this love story that transcends the test of time will leave it shattered into pieces.

Age of Youth 2

Age of Youth 2

The girls of the Bell Epoque boarding house (Han Ye Ri, KARA’s Han Seung Yeon, Park Eun Bin, Ji Woo) have returned, with more drama, shenanigans, and hilarity in tow! Picking up three months then a year after audiences first met the girls, “Age of Youth 2” continues to connect the characters through events that will challenge their strength in dealing with growing pains. And, oh, a new and lovable addition to the house (Choi Ah Ra) brings her own brand of quirkiness to the group. You might want to check out the first season of “Age of Youth” (if you haven’t yet) before hopping on to this one. Don’t worry, though, it wouldn’t be a waste of your time, since  the show, as a whole, is a refreshing take on the chick drama category. It’s fun, insightful, and the best part: It reminds you that you’re not alone in facing your daily struggles in love and life.

Girls’ Generation 1979

Girls' Generation 1979

Think “The Wonder Years,” but set in Daegu, Korea in the late ’70s. That’s pretty much a way to describe “Girls’ Generation 1979” – a coming-of-age dramedy that gives us a peek into the life of Jung Hee (WJSN’s Bona), who experiences the sweetness and pain of love and heartbreak for the first time. Joining her is a colorful set of characters, including the Seoulite Hye-Joo (Chae Soo Jin), a beauty-and-brains kind of girl who has just moved in to the city with her father; Dong Moon (Seo Young Joo), a charming nerd who has fallen for Jung Hee; Son Jin (Yeo Hoi Hyeon), who’s the epitome of Mr. Perfect to Jung Hee; and Young Choon (CNBLUE’s Lee Jonghyun), a hard-working young man who takes odd jobs to support himself and his little sister.

Light-hearted and endearing, “Girls’ Generation 1979” treats audiences to a delightful blast from the past, complete with nostalgic costumes, backdrops, references, and background music (The Carpenters, anyone?) that scream ’70s.

Because This Is My  First Life

Because This Is My First Life

What happens when two oddballs decide living together as a fake married couple? Laughter and angst ensue, apparently. Stoic mobile app designer Se Hee (Lee Min Ki) and homeless scriptwriter Ji Ho (Jung So Min) thought marrying each other would be the answer to their personal crises. One has an exorbitant house loan to pay, while the other is finding an ideal place to stay. Living together under a tenancy contract should be easy, they reckon, after all, they’re not in love with each other – or are they?

Joined by an equally colorful set of characters like the smart and sassy Sooji (Esom), romantic CEO Sang Goo (Park Byung Eun), manipulative girlfriend Ho Rang (Kim Ga Eun), and aspiring businessman Won Seok (Kim Min Seok), Se Hee and Ji Ho start to realize that they are finally entering a chapter in their 30s with more than what they bargained for.

It’s not everyday you come across a K-Drama that’s so beautifully written, it would be impossible for you to drop it. That’s “Because This Is My First Life.” Replete with quotes to live by, moments that strike a chord, and fearless takes on various aspects of life, it carefully weaves the contrasting personalities of realistic characters with realistic issues, bringing forth the ultimate slice-of-life story that’s not only for those struggling in their 30s, but for anybody who watches it. Really, do yourself a favor and check out this show. You can thank me later.

Written by Krew member Andy Flores

Beyond Borders, Peaceful Voyage; ASEAN-ROK Collaborative Painting

ASEAN-Korea artists and 80 volunteers with a goal of showcasing the friendship between the ASEAN and Korea gathered together to paint a 35 x 27.5-meter mural in the heart of Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City.

This project titled, ‘Beyond Borders: The Graffiti Art Project’, is one of the featured street art in Bonifacio Global City’s BGC Arts Center Festival 2017.

The partnership between Korean Cultural Center in the Philippines, National Commission for Culture and Arts and Bonifacio Art Foundation Inc. lead to the creation of this mural titled ‘Beyond Borders, Peaceful Voyage.’  

Features

To keep it traditional yet pop, a Korean Chaekgado, one of the traditional paintings during the Joseon dynasty, is the main feature of the painting. Inside are symbols and popular sites of ASEAN countries who participated in this project. These objects symbolize the friendship, diplomacy and cultural exchange across borders, united through a form of art. Aside from that, it’s also in time for the recent ASEAN conference held in the Philippines.

‘Beyond Borders, Peaceful Voyage.’  

Champions of Passion: Soulful Feats of Art

Five other street art works were featured on the three-day visual and cultural experience brought by the BGC Arts Center. Alongside are murals from local artists which are inspired by their own stories. These include the feel of longing, special meeting places, technology, dreams and normal life. Aside from these murals, stage plays were also featured from November 24-26 at the Maybank Arts Center.

Hop On, Hop Off Bus Tour

Free tours going to the mural sites were offered by the center for all art enthusiasts during the three-day event! Also, a ‘treasure hunt’ style map needs to be completed and snapshots of the six new paintings must be posted to get the special ‘art’ souvenir.

 

Were you able to join this event? If not, it’s not yet too late to see the murals up close. Don’t forget to share with us your photos!

The Beyond Borders: The Graffiti Art Project’ is located at 26th Street corner 5th Avenue, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City.

 

Written by Krew Member Mikay Javier

IPONING 101: The K-Pop Stan’s Guide to Saving Up

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“I-announce niyo na yung ticket prices, please, para makapag-ipon na ko!”

“Ang lapit naman ng ticket selling! ‘Di pa ko nakaka-ipon! T.T”

“Ang mahal naman! Wala pa ‘kong pera!!!”

Do these sound familiar? You must have cried something similar at least once in your life as a fan, and I could totally relate!

Being a K-Pop stan is costly. This is something I learned the hard way when I entered the fandom a little over a year ago with a decent account balance, only to feel as though I’ve gone bankrupt a few months later with more artist merchandise than money in my possession.

True enough, it’s all fun and exciting until you realize that you pretty much have nothing left to spend for more important things and – well, let’s all be honest here – more K-Pop. So what’s the right thing for a fan to do? Iponing, of course!

Saving up has since become more than just a habit to me; it’s a lifestyle, as it should be for you. After all, how else would you fund that gorgeous comeback album or that much-coveted concert ticket? If you’ve got better ideas, let me know. But for now, here are some tips on mindful saving and spending for K-Pop fans:

Don’t wait. Just start.
There’s no better time to start saving up than NOW. Even though it has not been announced that your favorite group is coming to the country or that they will be releasing a new album soon, it would be smart of you to grow your fandom fund as early as now, so when the time comes, you wouldn’t have to worry about not being able to afford joining a group order or being part of #TeamBahay – slash – #TeamLabas.

Set a goal
All of us have something we want to save up for, and for fans, it’s most likely a concert, a comeback album, or a dream trip to the mecca of K-Pop and K-Dramas, South Korea.

Now, think about what yours is and focus on that goal. Make a rough estimate of the price that comes with it, then use it as your target. It may seem tough to achieve at first, but not impossible. You’ll feel much more motivated to save up if you have a definite goal in mind.

Decide on where to keep your savings
So is it the old school glass jar or cutesy piggy bank for you? Whatever you choose, know that deciding on where to keep your savings is crucial. Make sure it’s accessible and convenient yet secured.

Personally, I prefer keeping my savings in the bank. I have an account that I maintain to fund my wants and wants only, which includes my K-Pop splurges. This prevents me from touching the amount I have in my actual savings account, which I consider strictly off-limits.

Compromise, not sacrifice.
They say a bit of sacrifice goes a long way. But don’t you think “sacrifice” is too dramatic a word? If anything, it makes the whole idea of saving up more daunting! So I say compromise – not sacrifice.

How? Well, there are “little” things you spend on daily that you can get through more cost-efficient means. Start keeping track of your expenses, and check which items you can cut back on or, better yet, ultimately stop paying for.

For instance, instead of buying coffee at your favorite café, why not just make your own brew at home? Ever considered bringing packed (and healthier) meals to school or work? How about bringing your own bottle of water or snacks to curb those sudden cravings?

While the small stuff you spend on may not be that noticeable in your everyday spending pattern, such expenses add up in the long run. Think about it, if you get your caffeine fix for P120 every weekday for six months, that amounts to P15,480, which is more than enough to cover an SVIP ticket to your favorite group’s concert, or, maybe, even a roundrip ticket to Korea!

Control
Control is a word I find synonymous to discipline, and saving money requires a lot of it.

Before you buy anything – and I mean anything – hold a mental debate whether or not you need it. If you hesitate even just a bit before saying yes, then, perhaps, it’s more of a want than a need, and you’re better off not buying it at the time being.

There are a lot of purchases I made in the past that I totally regret now. So save yourself the guilt, and just give up on that item you know wouldn’t come in handy in the near future.

Put your skills and free time to good use
Earning some extra on the side helps A LOT. It doesn’t matter how old you are. If you’ve got skills you know you can use to earn money, make good use of them.

For instance, if you have a proclivity for making fan art, then why not sell some unofficial merch? A friend of mine, who has a good hand in graphic design, produced bags, coin purses, and banners  – all printed with a design she made – to sell in time for a boy group’s then-upcoming concert. She did it out of fun, so she was really taken by surprise when the items sold out quicker than expected. She even had to make another batch to meet the demand!

What’s great about this is that you get to make money while doing something you enjoy (hone your skills even!), and that in itself is already gratifying.

Learn to let go
When I started my K-Pop collection, I thought I will never part with any of the items I’ve got. Albums, posters, magazines – name it, I probably have it. Or at some point, I did, because I’ve sold some of them now.

Yes. I hear you. How could I?

To be honest, it took me a while before I decided to put some of the merch I had on sale. I had a hard time acquiring them, they cost a lot, and they reminded me of the good ol’ times when I was head over heels in love with the artists they feature. But the thing is, they just take up space. I touched most of them only once, and that was when I took them out of their packaging. Some even remained unopened!

It then occured to me that, perhaps, they’re better off with other fans, who would actually use them and not just stash them, away and out of sight. So I took pictures of the items, posted them on Twitter and various K-Pop buy-and-sell groups on Facebook, and waited for interested buyers.

While I didn’t get the same amount I bought the items for, I got part of my money back, made some fans happy, and cleared a bit of space for future (hopefully useful) purchases.

Take care of yourself.
You might find this a strange tip to include on this list, but hear me out: No matter how tight things can get, you have to take care of yourself first and foremost.

If you think skipping meals or stressing yourself by working overtime regularly is the answer to your money woes, you’re wrong. You’re only making things worse for yourself, and the last thing you’d want to spend on are hospital fees and medication. So no matter how cliché the saying “health is wealth” is, believe in it.

Find ways to make saving up fun
Saving up isn’t exactly the most exciting phrase out there, so why not spice up your game with money challenges that will make saving money more fun for you? From saving an amount in increments to saving a particular Peso bill, there are several challenges that financial advisors highly recommend and swear by. Feel free to look them up online, choose what you think is the most doable for you, and jump right into it!

So that’s pretty much it! I know that tips are easier said than done, but trust me when I say that your hard work will pay off, and once you achieve your goal, it would be one of the most rewarding experiences you’ll ever have.


Written by Krew member Andy Flores

De La Salle Lipa Rides the Korean W​ave

The Korean Cultural Center (KCC) in the Philippines has always hosted culture caravans from various schools and organizations in Metro Manila, but this time, KCC went farther! For the first time, Korean Cultural Center visited Batangas for its culture caravan.

As of date, the biggest K-Culture Caravan took place at Sentrum, De La Salle Lipa, Batangas last October 19, 2017, with over 2,000 students participating in the whole day K-affair!

If you’re not familiar with Korean Culture Caravans, it is an event hosted in cooperation with schools to bring love and passion for Korean history and culture. Activities may vary from schools depending on the request, but the motivation remains the same – to cultivate Korean activities and make sure that faculty and students alike are given a chance to express, rediscover, and embrace the quintessence of graceful Korean culture and beauty.

The whole event was divided in five parts: 1) Film Screening featuring introduction to Korean culture, 2) Lecture on the Basics of the Korean Language, 3) Lecture on Mooninhwa (Korean Traditional Art), 4) Performances from DLSL Salindayaw Dance Troupe, Venisse Siy, and PHP, 5) Raffle Draw of special Korean goods. These events were repeated for the two batches of students who came and enjoyed the show.

The film screening taught students the Korean basic words – how they can say and write it. After this, teacher Lee Chunghee reviewed the words shown in the film as well as gave tips on how to study Hangul (Korean Alphabet), concepts, values, and customs. She even encouraged the students to visit sejonghakdang.org to know more about the lesson she introduced.

Subsequently, teacher Yoon Donghyun demonstrated the traditional Korean art of Mooninhwa and discussed the simple aesthetic themes incorporating poetry, calligraphy, and illustrations with dramatic simplicity. Mooninhwa shows vigor vividness and the feeling of a brush.

Later on, after a short break, three performances were revealed to the audiences. The performances showed how the cutting-edge music of Korea changes from traditional to modern. It really is a glimpse of experience beyond K-pop and K-dramas.

The last part of the event might be the most exciting as fans and those who are new to the K-culture got the chance to receive special prizes such as Essential Korean Grammar, Etiquette Guide to Korea, Pyeongchang 2018 Notepad, to name a few.

KCC booth was also present at the venue and had its own raffle promo where major prices such as Twice Ceci Poster (with the signature of all members!), The Heirs OST Album, and Song Joongki Poster were given away. All of the activities wouldn’t be complete without the photo booth at the event as well as the Hanbok experience booth where various students and faculty lined up to dress up and take photos on the set.

Interested to have an incredible experience like this? Email KCC at kccphcaravan@gmail.com or call at 555-1711. Your school might be the next stop for our extraordinary caravan!

Written by Krew Member Jean Singian

Every performance is a show-stopper at this year’s BEYOND BORDERS: ASEAN-KOREA Dance Exchange!

From K-pop, K-cuisine, and K-brands, Filipinos have always encountered and experienced diverse aspects of Korean culture. To celebrate the milestones of the 50th anniversary of Southeast Nations and the ASEAN-Korea Cultural Exchange Year, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) in partnership with the Korean Cultural Center (KCC) in the Philippines organized “Beyond Borders: ASEAN-Korea Dance Exchange” which took place at Star Theater, CCP Complex, Roxas Boulevard last October 20, 2017.

The culmination dance showcase started with the Philippine anthem, Korean anthem, and the ASEAN anthem. It was attended by diplomats from Cambodia, Indonesia, Iran, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, Oman, Korea and the Philippines. The said culmination was also made possible with the unwavering support of Ballet Manila through Ballet Manila CEO and Artistic Director Lisa Macuja-Elizalde.

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From Left: Korean Ambassador KIM Jae Shin, Ballet Manila through Ballet Manila CEO and Artistic Director Lisa Macuja-Elizalde, Wife of Korean Ambassador Madame LEE Jong Min and Korean Cultural Center of the Philippines Director LEE Jincheol

Ms. Adelina Suemith, OIC-Executive Director of NCCA shared on her introduction that the rich and vibrant culture of Korea can be best manifested through dance as it encompasses physical boundaries. Despite many differences, similarity happens during dance as it plays a radical role to show beyond traditional forms. This event was hosted in order to break new grounds for mutual understanding and respect between different cultures, magnifying the world with new perspectives and as the ambassador of Korea, Mr. Kim Jae-Shin aptly said, “It is not much of what we can do but who we will become in the future of the world.” He also mentioned that ASEAN is one of Korea’s key partners with its economic operations, people to people exchange, and cultural exchange.

Moving forward to the highlights of the show, the entire program showcased ballet which originated in the 15th century, specifically in Italy. It has developed in a fine art form which was visible in the fourteen (14) performances of graceful expressions, symmetry, fast movements as well as pure movement and physical expression. The night was the most spectacular manifestation of classical to neoclassical to contemporary dance, the fast-shifting movements of the performances added to the suspense and charm of the show. Take a look at the photos and performance recap below!

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  1. Sotto Voce – Choreography by Augustus “Bam” Damian III and music by Pachelbel’s Canon D in Major
  • Performed by Abigail Oliveiro (Singapore), Heewon Cho (Korea), Nanami Hasegawa (Japan), Violet Hong (Malaysia), Jihyeon Jang (Korea), and Resti Octaviani (Indonesia)
  • It showed how countries make connections, one by one, and how they harmonize each other through caring and helping each other.
  1. Rum Klong Yao (Thailand) – Music and choreography by Ministry of Culture of Thailand, Fine Arts Department
  • Performed by Narissa Porsawat and Nattachai Junlaworn
  • There’s no rush in love can best describe this performance.
  1. Morions (Philippines)– Choreography by Gerardo Francisco and music by Jessie Lucas
  • Performed by John De Dios, Rudy De Dious, Anselmo Dictado, Gerardo Francisco, Elpidio Magat, Romeo Peralta, Glenn Ragel, and Alvin Santos
  • This dance was astonishing with its highlight on how warriors leap, fly, and are just basically everywhere. The engaging warrior music and the fluidity of their moves were unstoppable.
  1. Pi Khroy KA Rom Roborsh Khnom (Behind my Dance – Cambodia ) – Choreography by Nam Narim and music by Ros Sokunthea
  • Performed by Nam Narim and Chanlyka Leav
  • This featured a lot of striking poses, from slow to fast, then gaining momentum again.
  1. Sayao Sa Pamlang (Philippines) – Choreography by Agnes Locsin and music by Bob Aves
  • Performed by Marinette Franco, Alvin Dictado, Rafael Perez, Rodney Catubay, John Carl Concepcion, Joshua Enciso, and Raymond Salcedo
  • This emphasized the use of bamboos and how folks from the early era believed that this dance helps drive away evil.
  1. Eclectic Shift (Malaysia) – Choreography by Mohd Yunus Ismail and Suhaili Micheline and music by Mat Mos
  • Performed by Chong Hoei Tzin and Mohd Shafiq Bin
  • This is a traditional Malaysian dance that depicts a sense of relationships, conflict and resolutions, companionship and competition between performers.
  1. Kinabuhing Mananagat (Philippines) – Choreography by Rudy De Dios and music by Visayan Folk Songs
  • Performed by Pia Dames, Rudy de Dios, John de Dios, Elpidio Magat, Glenn Ragel, and Alvin Santos
  • This performance depicted the life of fisher folks in the Visayas area accompanied by the fun music. Together with this, it also emphasized how Waray women are when they are in love – strong and fearless.
  1. Arachnida (Philippines) – Choreography by Agnes Locsin and music by Fagher
  • Performed by Joan Emery Sia and Romeo Peralta
  • It is a fascinating illustration of how spiders mate. Complicated stunts were made to look easy and one can see how the performers were one in their movements.
  1. Lui (Adventure Mission – Thailand ) – Choreography by Nattachai Junlaworn and music by Taylor Davis
  • Performed by Narissa Porsawat and Nattachai Junlaworn
  • An excellent performance mirroring the hardship of going through a difficult mission and successfully overcoming it.
  1. White Swan Adagio (Singapore and Philippines) – Choreography by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa and music by Peter Tchaikovsky
  • Performed by Abigail Oliverio and Mark Sumayo
  • The Swan Lake has been present for more than 130 years and is without question one of the greatest Romantic ballets in the ballet repertoire.
  1. Reve (Philippines) – Choreography by Ernest Mandap and music by Metallica as performed by Apocalyptica entitled “Nothing Else Matters”
  • Performed by Rudy De Dios and Gerardo Francisco
  • It is a journey of two men as they reach their dreams (Reve is the French word for dreams) together, no one is left behind.
  1. Muro Ami (Philippines) – Choreography by Gerardo Francisco and Music by Hanz Zimmer
  • Performed by Elyssabeth Apilado, Shaira Comeros, Kayla Coseteng, Marinette Franco, Monique Valera, Jefferson Balute, Rodney Catubay, John Carl Concepcion, Alvin Dictado, Joshua Enciso, Rafael Perez, and Raymond Salcedo.
  • Muro Ami is also one of the oldest but still relevant issues of the absolute portrayal of child labor in the high seas as they are being used in the illegal fishing system.
  1. Peung Ryu (Taste of the Arts – South Korea) – Choreography by Park So Jung and Ryu Seouk Hun and music by Ryu In Sang
  • Performed by Park So Jung and Ryu Seouk Hun
  • This performance shattered expectations and brings South Korea to stage accompanied by infused traditional music.
  1. Full Cast danced to Tinikling
  • Each representative of each country danced to Tinikling together with the Filipinos. The beat, tapping, and sliding showed how participants became one in their goal to promote the partnership between the countries.

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The event ended with the creative director and Lisa Macuja-Elizalde waving and dancing together with the whole ASEAN-Korea Dance Exchange Crew. Indeed, the night was filled with spectacular performances and there are no doubt partnerships between participating countries will only grow stronger!

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Written by Krew Member Jean Singian